Shifting From a Punitive Approach to Self-Reg: Guy Stephens

Self-Reg for parents, photo of man and son sitting on the grass together

In this follow-up post from Self-Reg Alumni Guy Stephens of the Alliance Against Seclusion & Restraint (read his first blog here), he shares how shifting from a punitive approach to Self-Reg is a central tenet in his work. He completed the Self-Reg Foundations program with a changed mindset and philosophy. Guy states that learning Self-Reg has helped him answer the question, “what should we do instead of using restraint and seclusion?”

Shifting from a punitive approach to Self-Reg is possible and Guy explains how:

Start reading Guy Stephens’ article below

A Self-Reg journey to reducing punitive approaches: The Self-Reg Foundations Certificate Program


Since I started the Alliance Against Seclusion and Restraint in 2019, I have looked for answers to the question I was so often asked, “what should we do instead of using restraint and seclusion?” I have done extensive research, talked to experts from around the globe, and participated in many hours of training. All of this has informed my firmly held belief that there are many things we can and should do to reduce and eliminate restraint, seclusion, and other punitive discipline practices.

Earlier this year, I enrolled in the Self-Reg Foundations Certificate Program. What is Self-Reg, you might ask? Self-Reg is an approach developed by Dr. Stuart Shanker. Self-Reg is a process for enhancing self-regulation by recognizing and reducing stress. The Self-Reg framework is designed to help children, youth, and adults. It is a powerful program for educators. The certificate training program is described as the flagship Self-Reg training program. Read the rest of his follow-up article here.

More About Guy Stephens

Guy Stephens is the founder of the Alliance Against Seclusion and Restraint. This organization has a vision of creating and supporting safer schools for students, teachers, and staff. They are on a mission to inform changes in policy and practice with goals of: 

  • reducing punitive approaches to behaviour 
  • eliminating the use of punitive discipline and outdated behavioral management approaches
  • ending the school-to-prison pipeline
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